Writing Your CV

Creating your curriculum vitae can be daunting, especially if you have never made one before. As requested, I have decided to make it a little easier and walk you through making your very own CV!

Before we begin, I wanted to explain the difference between a resume and a CV. A resume is a quick summary of your work experiences, it shouldn’t be longer than a page and highlights your strengths related to what you’re applying for. On the other hand, a CV is far more in-depth, for it covers your education, work experiences, and awards/honors in chronological order; therefore, it will be much longer than a resume.

Here are some of my personal tips on creating a successful CV:

  1.  Don’t use the word “I” when describing what you did. Since your name is already front and center, they already know who you are.
    1. Wrong: I worked with Dr. Bob to collect data on participants during a check-up
    2. Right: Collected data on participants during a check-up (I took out Dr. Bob because you should have already mentioned the individuals you worked with)
  2. Maintain the same tense throughout your CV to describe your roles and responsibilities- don’t use past tense and then switch to present!
  3.  Only include items that will help the reader understand who you are. Avoid making it too wordy because the reader will know when you’re making things up.
  4. Avoid adding items far in the past that aren’t prevalent to what you’re applying for.
    1. If you’re applying to Med School, what you did in high school doesn’t matter
    2. If you’re applying to residency, what you did in college doesn’t matter (unless you were published).
  5. Keep it simple and concise. Make sure to check for grammatical errors, for they can take away from your CV.
  6. Keep the font professional and constant throughout! Times, Arial, Calibri and Georgia are personally the best ones.
  7. Before sending your CV over technology, be sure to save it as a PDF and double check the format.

I personally have always stuck to a CV just because it covers everything I have accomplished. When applying to research or a job, I usually just add in a small sentence above my education highlighting why I’m qualified for the position. Some people opt to add their hobbies on their CV. This is optional, but I recommend doing it only if you feel you need more content.

I have attached a copy of the template I made for my own CV, feel free to use it or refer to when making your own. Again, if you have any questions or comments, feel free to e-mail me or comment below! I wish you all success in your future endeavors!

CV Template

 

Much love,

Preety 🙂

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